Category Archives: Drinks

Event: Drink Booze and Hear About Ice Cream Sodas

 

 

 

Photo: Hamilton Conservation Authority via Flickr.

Yes, I know, summer’s over. So what am I doing talking about ice cream? I should be talking about pumpkins. Or maybe turkeys.

Well, ice cream’s one of those treats that people love 24/7, 365 days a year. So even though it’s almost Halloween, I’m doing two events in the coming weeks where I’m talking about ice cream history and reading from my book Ice Cream: A Global History.

The first is in San Francisco Oct. 9 at Omnivore Books on Food. The second, part of the reading series Drink.Think, is in New York, where I’ll be part of a group reading about drinks, mostly alcoholic—except I’m reading about the sweet and innocent cream soda. (See below for details.)

 

 

 

Here’s the info.  Hope to see you there!

Omnivore Books of Food, San Francisco

Oct 9, 2012

6pm-7pm

3885 Cesar Chavez Street San Francisco, CA

415 282 4712

Drink: Think, New York, New York

 October 16, 2012

The bar will be open starting at 6pm – the reading starts at 7pm

Obra Negra, below Casa Mezcal

86 Orchard Street

212 777 2600

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Rosé: A Wine for All Seasons, Finally Getting Some Respect

Photo: mrsraggle, Flickr. 
 

By Ron Blumenfeld

During the summer, wine drinkers are drawn to crisp, refreshing white wines, while avoiding the hearty reds that help fortify us against the winter cold.

A rigidly seasonal approach to wine drinking is in my opinion a mistake. Meanwhile, though, there’s another option—rosé. The once-disparaged wine has been steadily gaining respectability as a summertime choice. But it’s also a good wine to drink any time of the year.

Rosé is typically made by limiting the contact of red grape skins to fermenting wine. It’s the skins that are largely responsible for imparting tannins and color to reds. When making rose, the outer layer is removed relatively early in the fermentation process. It’s the winemaker who decides when that will be, which in turn depends on the desired style and the grape(s) that are used.

Rosé surfaced in the U.S. in the 1960’s with imports such as Mateus and Lancer’s and domestic brands like Sutter Home. Cloyingly sweet and flabby, that first glass of White Zinfandel can nevertheless lead drinkers to more sophisticated Burgundies and Barolos.

Today, Americans have discovered that rosés can be serious yet charming. What’s more, the blush-colored wines range from mineral-crisp quaffing varieties to bold, fruity ones that blur the line between rosé and standard red wine. Southern France turns out great rosés, with the Tavel appellation arguably setting the gold standard.

Some wine stores carry 100 or more rosés over during the summer. Rely on the staff to guide you, and try out a few different styles. Two favorites of mine are Wolffer Estates from Long Island and Bagnol Cassis from Provence. Wolffer Estates makes a copper-colored rosé with subtle and delightful red fruit flavors. Bagnol Cassis from Provence, a pricy but elegant dry rosé, is great on its own or with seafood or light meats—even in winter.

Ron Blumenfeld is part owner of French vineyard Domaine des Bories.

 

 

 

 

 

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Beer Tastings and History at the New York Historical Society

Bar tray, 1900–1930. The New-York Historical Society, Gift of Bella C. Landauer. Photo: NYHS

By Laura B. Weiss

Calling all brewmeisters and beer fiends. You can sample beer and see exhibits chronicling the sudsy brew’s storied New York history at Brew Here, the New York Historical Society‘s summer exhibit, opening May 25, 2012.  It’ll go all summer long, until September 2.

The exhibit will walk you through beer’s long and colorful history in New York, from the 17th century to the present.  Apparently, New York’s brewing history is largely unknown. That’s kind of strange considering all the beer making going on these days.

So if you have a thirst for beer—not just drinking it, but knowing something about its local roots—mosey on over to the NYHS.  Here’s some of what you’ll learn and get to view:

  • The nutritional properties of colonial beer and early New York brewers in the age of revolution;
  • Large-scale brewing in nineteenth-century New York and the influence of immigration;
  • The influence of temperance and impact of prohibition;
  • Bottling, canning, refrigeration and other technological advances;
  • A 1779 account book from a New York City brewer who sold beer and ale to both the British and patriot sides
  • A bronze medal that commemorates an 1855 New York State temperance law;
  • Beer trays from a variety of late nineteenth-century brewers;
  • A sign from the campaign to repeal prohibition;
  • And a selection of advertisements from Piels, Rheingold and Schaefer,  hometown brewers of bygone days.

You’ll get thirsty after all that brewski learning.  Not to worry.  There’s a beer hall attached to the exhibit featuring  a selection of New York City and State artisanal beers. The beer hall hours are: Tuesday-Thursday and Saturdays: 2pm–6pm, Fridays: 2pm–8pm, Sundays: 2pm–5pm

Want more beer mind food and a host of tastings? Here are some other events that will take place throughout the summer.

For tickets to these programs, please call the New-York Historical Society’s call center at (212) 485-9268 or visit http://www.nyhistory.org/programs.

BEER APPRECIATION NIGHT: THE HISTORY AND RENAISSANCE OF AMERICAN BREWING

Tuesday, July 10, 6:30 PM

Program & Beer Tasting combined ticket $49 (Members $37)

Program only $24 (members $12)

Location: Robert H. Smith Auditorium at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West

BEER TASTINGS:

Individual Tasting Program $35 (Members $20). Six Pack Special Discount (purchase by telephone or in person only): purchase tickets to six separate tastings for only $150 (members $100). You must be 21 years old or older to enjoy our tastings.

EMPIRE BREWING COMPANY

Wednesday July 4, 2:00 pm & 4:00 pm

Saturday, July 7, 2:00 & 4:00 PM

Program $35 (Members $20).  You must be 21 or older to enjoy our tasting program.

Location: Robert H. Smith Gallery South at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West

CAPTAIN LAWRENCE BREWING COMPANY

Saturday, July 7, 2:00 & 4:00 PM

Program $35 (Members $20).  You must be 21 or older to enjoy our tasting program.

Location: Robert H. Smith Gallery South at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West

GENESEE BREWING COMPANY

Saturday, July 14, 2:00 & 4:00 PM

Program $35 (Members $20).  You must be 21 or older to enjoy our tasting program.

Location: Robert H. Smith Gallery South at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West

HEARTLAND BREWERY

Saturday, July 21, 2:00 & 4:00 PM

Program $35 (Members $20).  You must be 21 or older to enjoy our tasting program.

Location: Robert H. Smith Gallery South at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West

 ITHACA BEER COMPANY

Saturday, July 28, 2:00 & 4:00 PM

Program $35 (Members $20).  You must be 21 or older to enjoy our tasting program.

Location: Robert H. Smith Gallery South at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West

caramel malt and Cascade Hops; and Apricot Wheat Ale, an easy-drinking wheat beer is light in color and body with a hint of apricot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Fairway Upper West Side Does Food Demos Saturday

Fairway Upper West Side. Photo: Courtesy of Fairway.

If you’re shopping at Fairway Saturday, you can get free samples and watch some demos by the supermarket’s chefs and other food experts. No, there’s no demo of how to avoid mixing it up with the market’s famously aggressive shoppers.

The program takes place from 11am to 3 pm at the Upper West Side store  (2127 Broadway at 74th Street).

Here’s what’s on tap:

Michael Lewin—cookies.

Hannah Howard—cheeses

Benny Lanfranco—international coffees

Ray Venezia—Hereford shell steaks

Vinnie Olivieri—asparagus pasta

Produce—Uncle Vinnie’s green salads

Lori Levy—pancakes with maple syrup

Will Sneddon—shrimp salad

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Boozy Ice Cream Treats for the Holiday

Butter Pecan with Brandy Ice Cream. Photo: Ice Cream Happy Hour.

Want to get a buzz on for the holidays? You could stick to plain old cocktails. Or you could jazz them up a bit by adding ice cream.  Better yet, why not churn some ice cream that’s flavored by vodka, rum or some other liquor? Click here to read my HuffPo post with recipes you can use for the holidays or all year round.

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