Category Archives: Eggs

Get the Scoop at New Amsterdam Market’s Ice Cream Fest and Book Signing

From Ice Cream: A Global History (Reaktion Books) by Laura B. Weiss. Photo: Image Source/Rex Features.

Ice Cream Fanatics: The New Amsterdam Market’s 3rd Annual Ice Cream Sunday is Aug. 19. If you’re in NYC, stop by for ice cream from some great purveyors—plus, I’ll be signing (and selling) copies of my book, Ice Cream: A Global History.

The event’s from 12pm-4pm. I’ll be perched in a booth amongst the ice cream folks signing books from 1:30pm-3:30pm. Probably won’t have a whole lot of time to sample the ice cream. So…I hope someone brings me a few tastes.

Here’s who’s scooping and the scoop on tickets, hours, etc.

Gabrielle Carbone of THE BENT SPOON

Joseph Roselli of DREAM SCOOPS

Amy Miller of EARLY BIRD COOKERY

Tracy Obolsky of ESCA

Keren Weiner of IL BUCO & IL BUCO ALIMENTARI & VINERIA

Ashley Whitmore of MARLOW & SONS

Fany Gerson of LA NEWYORKINA

Catherine Oddenino of LUCA & BOSCO

James Distefano of ROUGE TOMATE

Forbes Fisher of STEVE’S ICE CREAM

Ben Van Leeuwen of VAN LEEUWEN ARTISAN ICE CREAM

TICKET INFORMATION

EARLY BIRD ADMISSION $30 – Starts 12pm

(10 Tasting Tickets, redeem for 10 miniature cones)

GENERAL ADMISSION $20 – Starts 1pm

(8 Tasting Tickets, redeem for 8 miniature cones)

At the door: $35 for Early Bird and $25 for General Admission

PURCHASE TICKETS HERE

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Metropolitan Museum Show Depicts Dutch Foodways at the Time of Hudson’s Discovery of New York

Curious about what the the 17th century Dutch ate around the time Henry Hudson first spotted Manhattan in 1609?

Then walk across Central Park to the Met Museum. There, you’ll find a small exhibit of

Photo: Metropolitan Museum of Art

Photo: Metropolitan Museum of Art

some of Vermeer’s masterpieces. Aside from being in the company of some of the world’s greatest works of art, you’ll be treated to an intimate view of Dutch domestic life. Food and its preparation are everywhere in these works.

The centerpiece is Vermeer’s Milkmaid, a luminous portrait of a young woman making what appears to be bread pudding. On loan from the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, the painting portrays the milkmaid pouring milk from a red ceramic pitcher into a bowl (the Met displays similar artifacts in a glass case near the painting). On the table are rounds of crusty bread that look as if they could have come right from the ovens of the Sullivan Street Bakery.

Also in the exhibit are the works of artists who painted around the same time as Vermeer. Everywhere, you get a glimpse of kitchen life. There are carrots and tomatoes arrayed on a kitchen table, sides of glistening beef, baskets of eggs, and chickens and rabbits laid out  in a market stall.

The show will be on view until Nov. 29.

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Upper West Side Coffee Shop: Elite Café and Restaurant

For a totally solid breakfast place—nothing fancy here despite the name—try Elite coffee shop on Columbus at 68th. That’s where I met my friends Ron and Ellie the other day for a late breakfast.

My lox was surprisingly fresh and delicious, only a slight cut below Barney Greengrass. Ellie pronounced her omelet with tomatoes and feta completely satisfying, while Ron devoured his sandwich of salami and cheese.

This is the kind of place, scruffy and diner-ish though it may be, where everyone knows your name. Ellie and Ron are regulars and the staff greeted them like long-lost family.

Elite Cafe and Restaurant

186 Columbus
New York, NY
212-724-8850

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Vermont: Leaves and Happy Chickens

My hubby was dying to see the autumn foliage. Since I have a brother to visit in the Green Mountain State, we figured we’d pop up to Vermont and do the leaf peeper thing. What we didn’t count on was 85 degree weather. It’s been so warm here that the leaves barely sport even a tiny bit of color.

Still, we pumped up the AC in the car to high and went searching for the elusive leaves. We found a few yellow and red clumps near Rutland. Better yet, we found WAAWWE Farm in Chester. A sign said: “farm market,” so we turned down a dirt road, past some happy looking cows munching on grass and pulled up to a barn. There, a guy was selling yummy unfiltered apple cider. In the bar and outside in the barnyard was a squad of pecking, squawking chickens, free-range, that’s for sure.

Inside the barn, a woman was selling intensely buttery cheese made form the milk of those happy cows I saw out in the pasture. There was also honey from the farm’s hives (we watched two guys in space suits taking apart the hive to harvest the honey), jams, quail eggs, and if you get there early enough, eggs from the chickens.

How happy are they? “The girls are very happy and they can’t wait to see me every morning,” insisted the woman selling us the farm fare, which also included the sweetest raspberries I’ve ever eaten. “When I drive up in the morning, they all come running. They know the sound of my car.”

Now those are chickens whose eggs are worth getting up early for.

WAAWWE Farm
157 Thompson Road
Chester, VT
802 875 6576
Open daily 8 am-6pm except Wednesdays

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Behind the Wall

In the process of renovating one of our bathrooms, the contractor found some moldering newspaper behind the tile wall, dating from Wednesday, Oct. 7, 1936. Yellow and crumbling, this page from the New York Star, featured the following food story: “Tony Easts ‘Em Shell and All.’ The story revealed that recent Italian immigrant,Anthony Laforenza, a Bronx tavern keeper, was in the habit of scarfing down eggs, shells and all. Laforenza, according to the story, claimed he was the champion egg gobbler of the world. But that’s not all. Along with eggs, Tony, consumed other items along with two dozen eggs: a raw unpeeled potato, a lemon, some bologna, cellophane wrapping, and a glass of beer and a glass of wine.

In 1936, in the depths of the Depression, Americans were looking to crazy stunts to cheer themselves up — from marathon dancing to egg devouring. Those were far more innocent — and less demanding — times. Today, we require more sophisticated amusements, like video games and flat panel TVs, to take our minds off the state of the world.

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