Category Archives: Farmers Markets

A Meal with Alice Waters Will be Offered at New Amsterdam Public Market’s Online Auction

Starting right now through Feb. 24, you can bid on some great goodies if you log onto the New Amsterdam Public Market auction web site.

Supporters are trying to raise enough money to secure a permanent place for the market, which will feature  goods from a range of  local and organic purveyors.

Here are some of the food and other items being offered.  Most are designed to accommodate large groups:

–a tour of Brooklyn breweries past and present, with Urban Oyster (for groups of 10 or more)

–a kayak trip through oyster beds and marshes, along with a clam bake, with Bluepoint Oyster Co. (6 to 10 friends)

— a simple meal in New York City with Chef Alice Waters (two to four friends)

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New Amsterdam Market Update

From the folks at New Amsterdam Public, a new market trying to take root downtown. They held a one day event a couple of weeks ago in the old Fulton Fish market, which apparently drew thousands:

On Sunday, December 16th, WINTERMARKET, our all-day event at the New Market Building (former home of the Fulton Fish Market) was an incredible success. Over 35 food vendors including wild food foragers, farmers, bakers, beekeepers, and chefs presented a bounty of seasonal food to celebrate, taste, and purchase. Despite the ominous weather predictions, thousands of people attended and had a great time.

Check out our website for photos and details of the event. Please help us spread the word. Let your friends and family know about New Amsterdam Public, its vision, and how to get more involved.

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Wall Street: Winter Market Debuts

Want to purchase regional, sustainable food at a new downtown market? Then come to Winter Market on Dec. 16, presented by New Amsterdam Public. The group is trying to secure the old Fulton Fish Market and turn it into a farmer’s market.

What: Winter Market
A seasonable celebration of regional and sustainable food sourced, selected, produced and prepared by a new generation of purveyors.

When: Sunday, Dec. 16, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Where: The Fulton New Market Building, South Street Between Peck Slip and Beekman Street

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Essex Street Market

I haven’t been to the Essex Street Market on the Lower East Side for at least a year. Boy, have things changed. The last time I was there Anne Saxelby, the esteemed cheesemonger, had just opened her stall. Most of the purveyors in the market cater to local residents, but Anne and others have brought some interesting new food concepts to the place.

You won’t find a greater advocate for American farmstead cheeses than Anne. When I passed by her stall, she was presiding over her hand-picked, select group of cheeses. I asked for a sheep’s or goat’s milk cheese and she chose Twig Farm’s wonderful goat wheel. Soft and nutty with honey tones, it was incredibly delicious.

Right nearby is Formagio Kitchen’s New York outpost. Based in Cambridge, Mass., this purveyor prides itself on its knowledge of individual cheesemakers and their cheeses. Max, the accommodating cheesemonger, gave me tastes of half a dozen Spanish and Italian cheeses all the while keeping up a nonstop commentary on their origins, aging processes, etc. My favorite, and the one I bought, was a pecorino rosso in which the rind is coated with tomato paste, imparting a delicate sweetness to the cheese.

Next, I stopped by Jeffrey’s Meats. “Do you have a brochure?” I asked the 7th generation butcher. “I’m the brochure,” he said, laughing. If you want alligator or pheasant or just a steak, Larry has it at prices that beat his uptown competitors. I bought some rabbit and veal sausage to cook Sunday night.

At Paradou Marche (an offshoot of the brasserie in the Meatpacking District) which has two stalls — one for pasta, sauces, oils, salts and the like–the other for inventive sandwiches– the accommodating sandwich maker agreed to make me half a sandwich of freshly made pork roast and manchego on a crispy baguette. The buttery, aromatic crunch every time I took a bite left me swooning.

Essex Street Market
120 Essex Street (at Delancey Street)
New York, NY

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San Francisco: Ferry Terminal Market

It’s amazing to travel to the San Francisco area and see that produce can be fresh and enticing at a time –early spring — when in New York the Greenmarket is just emerging from its winter slumber.

At the Ferry Terminal Market in San Francisco, there are only a few produce stands but the oranges, and even the tomatoes, looked good enough to eat. I’ve already written about the heavenly oysters I devoured at the Hog Island Oyster Company.

Of all the shops I browsed, none enticed me more than Recchiuti chocolates. The burnt caramel, dark chocolate ganache blended with caramel and the lavender vanilla were silky and luscious. Don’t miss the burnt caramel almonds. They come in a cute little black pouch, the easier to down them all in one sitting (which I did with the help of The Hubby).

Stonehouse Olive Oil, from organically farmed groves in Oroville, CA, was smoky and delicate. For an astounding assortment of mushrooms and other fungi, try Far West Fungi, which grows organic mushrooms (Shiitake, Tree Oyster, Lions Mane, Maitake, and King Oyster) at its farm in Monterey Bay.

All vendors can be found at the Ferry Terminal.

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