Category Archives: Pork

Are You a Bacon Zealot? Check Out Camp Bacon

by Laura B. Weiss

What’s better than bacon?  Well, if you’re a diehard bacon freak, four days of bacon immersion sounds like a pretty fat-ulous way to spend an early summer weekend.

At this bacon bacchanalia, dubbed Bacon Camp by Zingerman’s, the Ann Arbor food purveyor who is behind the event, you can be sure you’ll eat lots and lots and lots of bacon.

The pig-out will run from May 31 to June 2 and includes an all-day bacon talk-a-thon June 2nd. At that gathering, you’ll get to hear some of the country’s top bacon luminaries hold forth on perhaps the piggiest of pork.There will be bacon educators (hmm, what’s that?), bacon historians and of course bacon makers and producers, including Alan Benton, of Benton’s Country Hams.

It’ll be “a weekend of bacon-focused expositions and feeds that make sense of our national love affair with all things smoky and piggy and good,” says John T. Edge, the food writer and head of the Southern Foodways Alliance, which will get the proceeds from the event.

In addition to the all-day June 2nd Bacon Camp, you can go whole hog at a bacon and BBQ dinner June 1st. There’s also a bacon street fair June 3rd that will be held at the Ann Arbor Farmer’s Market.

Are you sizzling with anticipation?

Here’s the tentative lineup for the Bacon Camp to be held at Zingerman’s Roadhouse, Ann Arbor, MI.

Emile de Felice – owner of Caw Caw Creek Farms, South Carolina – the ins and outs of sustainable hog farming
Allan Benton – founder and owner, Benton’s Country Hams – the tradition of pork curing in the Appalachians
Audrey Petty – author and poet – bacon and African American foodways
Geoff Emberling – PhD archeologist and museum curator – hog raising in the Middle East before Mohammed
Ji Hye Kim – founder of San Street – a brief survey of bacon cooking and eating in Asia
Ari Weinzweig – co-founding partner of Zingerman’s and author of Zingerman’s Guide to Better Bacon – a look at bacon history in Hungary

For tickets and more information, click here.

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A Man-Pleasing Recipe for Father’s Day: Bacon Chive Rice

Bacon. Photo: by shawnzam via flickr.

This man-pleasing bacon and rice recipe for Father’s Day—or any day you want to please your man—comes from a 1971 booklet called Man-pleasing Recipes, published by the Rice Council of America.

The cover photo, explains Chef Renee, shows a huge rare roast beef, along side a casserole of colorful seasoned rice. You can also pair this bacony rice with gazpacho and a salad.

As for the bacon?  A recent study revealed that Americans eat more bacon today than at any time in the last 15 years!

Bacon Chive Rice

INGREDIENTS

3 slices bacon, diced

3 cups cooked rice

¼ cup chopped chives

½ teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon pepper

1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

METHOD

Cook bacon until crisp. Add rice, chives and seasonings. Blend well and heat thoroughly.

Makes 6 servings.

 

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Memorial Day Recipe: Coca-Cola Glazed Baby Back Ribs

Coke and Ribs. Photo Credit: Jeanine Dargis

Coke and Ribs. Photo Credit: Jeanine Dargis

 

 

On Memorial Day, you want to eat something that shouts, summer is here!

That means it’s time for southern cookbook author Virginia Willis‘ Coca-Cola ribs. I’m a sucker for all things southern. And as Willis points out, Coke was born and bred in the south—in Atlanta, that is.

Says this charming doyenne of southern cooking:

Coca-Cola is to Atlanta as Guinness is to Dublin. Pork has a natural affinity for sweet, rich caramel flavors. These “nouveau” Southern ribs are by no means traditional, but they are lip-smacking good. Scotch bonnet peppers are intensely hot, but their fire is tempered by the sweetness of the sugar and Coke. To tone down the heat, substitute jalapeños instead.

Here’s the Coke-soused ribs recipe from Willis, who adapted it  from her cookbook, Bon Appétit, Y’all: Recipes and Stories from Three Generations of Southern Cooking by Virginia Willis, published by Ten Speed Press.

Coca-Cola Glazed Baby Back Ribs

1 cup Coca-Cola Classic (or regular Coke)
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
11/2 cups firmly packed light brown sugar
2 Scotch bonnet chiles, chopped
2 racks baby back ribs (3 pounds total)
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper

To make the glaze, in a small saucepan, bring the Coca-Cola, vinegar, brown sugar, and chiles to a boil over high heat; reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer until syrupy, about 10 minutes. Decrease the heat to low and keep the sauce warm while the ribs cook.

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Liberally season both sides of the ribs with salt and pepper. Place the ribs on a broiler pan and bake for 30 minutes, glazing the ribs occasionally with the Coca-Cola mixture. Turn the ribs over and continue to cook for an additional 30 minutes, glazing occasionally, or until the ribs are tender and the meat is starting to pull away from the bone.

Or, if grilling, simply treat the oven as a grill. Cook the ribs at a moderate heat, 325°F and bake with the grill covered for 30 minutes, glazing the ribs occasionally with the Coca-Cola mixture. Turn the ribs over and continue to cook for an additional 30 minutes, glazing occasionally, or until the ribs are tender and the meat is starting to pull away from the bone.

When the ribs are cooked through, set the oven to broil or place on the hot side of the grill or increase a gas grill to high. Liberally spoon half of the remaining glaze over the ribs and broil until glazed a deep mahogany brown, 5 to 7 minutes. Turn over; repeat with the remaining glaze, an additional 5 to 7 minutes.

Serve immediately with lots of napkins.

 

 

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