Tag Archives: BBQ

First Annual Beer Month Kicks Off With Grill-Off at Water Taxi Beach

There had to be a month devoted to local beer making and imbibing, right?  And what better month than July?  That’s assuming the sun comes out, it gets hot and steamy like a normal  NY summer–and it stops raining.  A tall order, I know, given that, weather-wise, we’ve turned into Portland, OR,

water-taxi-beachSlow Food is using the occasion of Good Beer Month to drum up support for some worthy food causes. Water Taxi Beach in Queens will be the site July 21 of the great “Local Grill-Off,” the Good Beer Month kickoff featuring featuring hot dogs and such, not to mention suds from Red Hook’s  Six Point Brewery.

Here’s the info:

When:  July 21 (Tuesday), from 4pm-8pm (rain or shine).

What: The signature event of the first annual Good Beer Month will be the “Local Grill-Off” at Queen’s Water Taxi Beach benefiting the Slow Food NYC Harvest Time program. Harvest Time supports edible Victory Gardens, Student Farm Stands, and Good Food and Nutrition Education at schools in East Harlem, on the Lower East Side, and in Williamsburg.

Cooks will battle it out for the title of Good Beer Month Grill-off Champion, preparing their creative takes on traditional, and not so traditional, grill fare.. burgers, sausages, hot dogs.. produced from animals raised sustainably and humanely on regional farms. Six Point Brewery will serve up brews.

Good Beer Month will showcase great, neighborhood good beer bars and outstanding local breweries. Events will benefit non-profit organizations, including Slow Food NYC.

Where: Water Taxi Beach, Queens

How Much: Buy tickets at: www.brownpapertickets.com/event/71753
$30 Slow Food Members/$35 Non-members
Ticket cost does not include beverages.

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Recipe: Make Dad Happy With Rib-Eye Steaks

There must be vegan dads out there, but they don’t happen to be members of my meat-loving family. For my hubby, and for my dad, both die-hard carnivores, when it comes to picking a Father’s Day meal, the dish of choice is obvious—a perfectly cooked steak. In fact, were it not for pesky health issues like cholesterol, they’d chow down on steak 365 days a year—with maybe a break for a burger or two.

Sure, my men would love to hoof it over to Peter Luger’s to celebrate Father’s Day. But with the economy in the tank, not this year. Instead, we’re cooking our steaks at home, on the grill. That’s why this Spicy Salt-Rubbed Rib-Eye Steak from Chef Renee Marton, is just the ticket for a Father’s day BBQ.

Ribeye steaks ont the grill.  Photo: WmJr via Flickr

Ribeye steaks ont the grill. Photo: WmJr via Flickr.

Learn more about Chef Renee here.
Send Chef Renee your cooking questions. 


SPICED SALT RUBBED RIB-EYE STEAK

Renee Marton

Where’s the beef?  Well, I can tell you that your steak-loving dad will drool over this mouthwatering Rib-Eye. It boasts a crust that’s at once salty, sweet, smoky, and spicy. Personally, I like to eat it with my fingers, but if you must use utensils, well, then, okay.  Homemade potato salad, a red radish and arugula salad, and grilled red onions (a way to use up the residual heat of the grill) are the perfect accompaniments.  To drink: a locally produced artisan beer, Sangria or unsweetened iced tea.

INGREDIENTS

1 two-pound Rib-Eye steak, about 1 ½ inches thick
2 tablespoons Kosher salt
1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
2 pieces star anise
1 teaspoon granulated sugar
½ teaspoon garlic powder
½ teaspoon coriander seeds

½ teaspoon smoked paprika

Spray canola oil

DIRECTIONS

  • Oiled pre-heated grill to 450°F
  • In a coffee grinder or mortar and pestle, pulverize star anise and coriander seeds.
  • Mix with salt, pepper, sugar, garlic powder and smoked paprika.  Rub on both sides of steak, and leave at room temperature for 60 minutes before grilling.
  • Grill should be hot, clean and lightly sprayed (carefully) or brushed with oil (or the oil can be brushed on with an oiled paper towel, or with a paintbrush—before pre-heating).
  • If you are using any kind of wood or briquettes that can be moved, place them in a pile so there is a hot spot, and keep the rest of the grill cooler.  If using a gas grill, start high, and then turn the flame down once the steak is turned over.
  • Place steak on grill, at hottest point.  Do not touch for the next five minutes.  After 5 minutes, turn steak in a different direction, but keep on same side.  This will produce a nice crisscross pattern.
  • Wait three minutes. Turn steak over and grill another 4 to 5 minutes, in a less hot part of the grill.  Remove steak from grill and place on a tilted platter (so the juices can run off, into a small plate). Let steak rest for at least 10 minutes.  Do not cover, or the crust will become soggy. Keep meat away from cold drafts, so it stays warm.
  • When ready to serve, slice the meat on a 45° angle into ½ thick slabs, and pour on the accumulated juices.

Yield:  4-6 servings

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Memorial Day Recipe: Coca-Cola Glazed Baby Back Ribs

Coke and Ribs. Photo Credit: Jeanine Dargis

Coke and Ribs. Photo Credit: Jeanine Dargis

 

 

On Memorial Day, you want to eat something that shouts, summer is here!

That means it’s time for southern cookbook author Virginia Willis‘ Coca-Cola ribs. I’m a sucker for all things southern. And as Willis points out, Coke was born and bred in the south—in Atlanta, that is.

Says this charming doyenne of southern cooking:

Coca-Cola is to Atlanta as Guinness is to Dublin. Pork has a natural affinity for sweet, rich caramel flavors. These “nouveau” Southern ribs are by no means traditional, but they are lip-smacking good. Scotch bonnet peppers are intensely hot, but their fire is tempered by the sweetness of the sugar and Coke. To tone down the heat, substitute jalapeños instead.

Here’s the Coke-soused ribs recipe from Willis, who adapted it  from her cookbook, Bon Appétit, Y’all: Recipes and Stories from Three Generations of Southern Cooking by Virginia Willis, published by Ten Speed Press.

Coca-Cola Glazed Baby Back Ribs

1 cup Coca-Cola Classic (or regular Coke)
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
11/2 cups firmly packed light brown sugar
2 Scotch bonnet chiles, chopped
2 racks baby back ribs (3 pounds total)
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper

To make the glaze, in a small saucepan, bring the Coca-Cola, vinegar, brown sugar, and chiles to a boil over high heat; reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer until syrupy, about 10 minutes. Decrease the heat to low and keep the sauce warm while the ribs cook.

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Liberally season both sides of the ribs with salt and pepper. Place the ribs on a broiler pan and bake for 30 minutes, glazing the ribs occasionally with the Coca-Cola mixture. Turn the ribs over and continue to cook for an additional 30 minutes, glazing occasionally, or until the ribs are tender and the meat is starting to pull away from the bone.

Or, if grilling, simply treat the oven as a grill. Cook the ribs at a moderate heat, 325°F and bake with the grill covered for 30 minutes, glazing the ribs occasionally with the Coca-Cola mixture. Turn the ribs over and continue to cook for an additional 30 minutes, glazing occasionally, or until the ribs are tender and the meat is starting to pull away from the bone.

When the ribs are cooked through, set the oven to broil or place on the hot side of the grill or increase a gas grill to high. Liberally spoon half of the remaining glaze over the ribs and broil until glazed a deep mahogany brown, 5 to 7 minutes. Turn over; repeat with the remaining glaze, an additional 5 to 7 minutes.

Serve immediately with lots of napkins.

 

 

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Dinosaur BBQ: A Second Bite

Awhile back, I wrote that Dinosaur BBQ, the Harlem outpost of the ribs chain, was a keen disappointment. Yesterday, I went back.

Maybe it was that I was coming off the first bike ride of the season.  Or maybe it was that there was a different chef in huge-pigsthe kitchen cooking up the ribs, pulled pork, brisket and other ‘Q standards.  But, wow, what a difference a few months makes!

My Texas brisket sandwich was succulent and perfectly seasoned.  I ordered the platter and was rewarded with excellent steak-cut fries and cold slaw. Dump a wad of  slaw on the sandwich and you’re in BBQ heaven.

Then there were the ribs. Were they the best my hubby and I have ever eaten?

Definitely not. A bit dry, the meaty Dinosaur BBQ ribs ribs boasted a sweet/tangy bite.  For great ribs without traveling too far south, you have to find tiny White Post, VA and hunt down Mr. B’s.

Hubby, I should say, loved them. But then any kind of meat on a bone gets a thumbs up from him.

So if you go, lunch time is a bit more pleasant than dinner. The place is quieter and the service is speedier.

Dinosaur BBQ
646 W 131st St.
New York, NY
212 694 1777
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Dinosaur BBQ Disappoints

Ribs, Craig's Recipes

Craig's Recipe-Ribs

I know that the Dinosaur BBQ outpost in Harlem boasts boatloads of passionate pig partisans.  One of them, a friend from Chicago, took me there the other night.  “You’ll love it,” she said.  “It’s great barbecue.”

Sorry.  No sale.  I’ve traveled through much of the South, and this, folks, is no BBQ.  I know NYC thinks of itself as one of the nation’s great centers of ‘cue, but you need to head south to get the real stuff.  (For succulent pork, travel to Mr. B’s in White Post Virginia, just two short hours from DC, where you’ll find finger lickin’ great ‘cue and the best sweet potato pie anywhere.)

The pulled pork piled onto my sandwich at Dinosaur tasted like someone in the kitchen was still yanking on the poor pig who produced this mediocre fare.  The meat was tough, rubbery and tasteless.  Accompanied by watery over-sweet greens, the platter was a keen disappointment.  A huge salad with candied walnuts tasted OK, but a chunk of cornbread failed to measure up to the muffins dished out by any corner coffee wagon guy.

Service was barely passable.  I had to ask my waiter to refill my glass four times before it was finally refreshed.  As for the noise level, it was high, but that’s to be expected in a ‘cue joint.

Dinosaur Barbecue
646 W 131st St.
New York, NY
212 694 1777

Related: Dinosaur BBQ: A Second Bite

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