Tag Archives: book

Scary Stuff About Ice Cream on Halloween

Yes, ice cream has its scary side. Like poison ice cream cones. Like contaminated street cart ice cream.

I talked on Halloween to gluten-free guru Jean Layton about ice cream’s underbelly, plus some ice cream history I unearthed in my book, Ice Cream: A Global History.

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Event: Drink Booze and Hear About Ice Cream Sodas

 

 

 

Photo: Hamilton Conservation Authority via Flickr.

Yes, I know, summer’s over. So what am I doing talking about ice cream? I should be talking about pumpkins. Or maybe turkeys.

Well, ice cream’s one of those treats that people love 24/7, 365 days a year. So even though it’s almost Halloween, I’m doing two events in the coming weeks where I’m talking about ice cream history and reading from my book Ice Cream: A Global History.

The first is in San Francisco Oct. 9 at Omnivore Books on Food. The second, part of the reading series Drink.Think, is in New York, where I’ll be part of a group reading about drinks, mostly alcoholic—except I’m reading about the sweet and innocent cream soda. (See below for details.)

 

 

 

Here’s the info.  Hope to see you there!

Omnivore Books of Food, San Francisco

Oct 9, 2012

6pm-7pm

3885 Cesar Chavez Street San Francisco, CA

415 282 4712

Drink: Think, New York, New York

 October 16, 2012

The bar will be open starting at 6pm – the reading starts at 7pm

Obra Negra, below Casa Mezcal

86 Orchard Street

212 777 2600

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Ice Cream Book Wins Praise from David Lebovitz

Ice Cream A Global History

Ice Cream: A Global History

David Lebovitz‚ Perfect Scoop author and former pastry chef at Chez Panisse in Berkeley, CA, the popular restaurant owned by Alice Waters, said after reading Ice Cream, “It’s great.”

Ice Cream: A Global History is the place to turn if you want to know the backstory of everyone’s favorite frozen treat!”

Click here to purchase Ice Cream: A Global History (Reaktion Books – Edible)

Even Picasso couldn't resist ice cream cones. Man with A Straw Hat and an Ice Cream Cone (1937). Photo: Musee National Picasso, Paris (Succession Pablo Picasso, Paris/DACS). P. 73, Ice Cream: A Global History by Laura B. Weiss

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New Yorker Serves Up Annual Food Issue

It’s that time of year again—that much-anticipated time when the New Yorker’s food issue hits the newsstands. The Nov. 24th issue is out today and it’s filled with tantalizing stories from the likes of Calvin Trillin and Jane Kramer. I’m particularly intrigued by Kramer’s piece, summarized below, which focuses on the cultural forces that produce a particular cuisine.

Speaking of which…I’m writing a culinary history of ice cream (Reaktion Books). Stay tuned for the publication date.

Here are links to several pieces in the New Yorker’s food issue. The excerpt from Kramer’s piece follows below:

Podcast Bilger on Beer
Ask the Author with Calvin Trillin:
Slide Show- Photojournalists talk about memorable on-the-job meals

Exploring the World Through Its Food

In “The Hungry Travellers” (p. 100), Jane Kramer profiles Jeff Alford and Naomi Duguid, the award-winning authors of cookbooks such as “Hot Sour Salty Sweet” and “Beyond the Great Wall,” who, Kramer writes, “have been called culinary anthropologists, but culinary geographers is at least as accurate.” “While their books are undeniably cookbooks,” Kramer writes, “they are also cultural encounters—travel journals, stories, history lessons, and photographic essays that, taken together, explore the imagination and the exigencies that produce a cuisine and, in many ways, define the people who create it.”

“We write to travel” is how Duguid describes their life. James Oseland, the editor of Saveur, tells Kramer, “It’s their overriding sense of humanity that sets them apart from the flock. They’re taking the exotic out of the everyday in every sense, not simply the recipe sense. They’re telling you, ‘It’s just the world. The world won’t hurt you. Don’t be scared.’ ”

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