Tag Archives: food events

Smorgasburg Feasting

by Laura B. Weiss

Who cares if there’s a half hour wait for barbecue or pint-sized cheesecakes? You’ve gotta love Smorgasburg for the scene, the food and the gorgeous views of the skyline. Extra bonus: if you’re not a Brooklynite and coming from Manhattan, take the ferry back from Williamsburg to Midtown. On a gorgeous day, the ride matches the food.

Photos by Laura B. Weiss

cropped girl best

ice cream vendorBESTcupcakes

smorgasb grilling guy

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NY Coffee and Tea Festival Coming Feb. 19-20

Coffee pots. Photo by by Lotzman Katzman via flickr.

Coffee drinker or tea lover? Whatever your preference, the NY Coffee and Tea Festival may make you forget (at least for an hour or two) the awful winter we’re having.

Here are the details:

NYC’s COFFEE AND TEA FESTIVAL

What: The northeast Ultimate Barista Challenge® competition and a VIP tea tasting with two guest Hong Kong tea masters. Other offerings:

  • coffee cupping & tasting,
  • afternoon tea etiquette,
  • making tea cocktails,
  • incorporating coffee into your favorite recipes.
  • Exhibitors include: Melitta, Tavalon Tea, Harney & Sons Fine Teas, Jalima Coffee, Fang Gourmet Tea, Peet’s Coffee & Tea, TeaClassics, Aroma Espresso Bar, Hancha Tea, Coffee Lab Roasters, Montauk Beverage Works, Runa, Joe’s Coffee House, QTrade Teas, Entenmann’s Coffee, World Green Tea Association, and the Tea Association of the U.S.A.

Where: The Festival will be held at 7 W, 7 West 34th Street. The event is open to the public and the trade. www.CoffeeAndTeaFestival.com.

When: February 19-20, 2011

Tickets can be purchased in advance at: www.CoffeeAndTeaFestival.com. The event is sponsored in part by www.CoffeeAndTeaNewsletter.com. Prices range from $20-$40.

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Pickle Day Slated for Oct. 17 on Lower East Side

Photo: Ilovepickles.org

I don’t want a pickle

Just want to ride on my motorsickle

Well, Arlo Guthrie may prefer motor bikes to pickles, but not me!  If you’re a pickle lover stop by the 10th annual International Pickle Day on Broom Street between Orchard and Ludlow on the Lower East Side.

There are pickle samples from around the world, says the NYFood Museum, one of the event’s sponsors. In its heyday, the Lower East Side was home to well over 100 pickle enterprises.

On hand at the festival will be some foods that are traditionally pickled—and some I’d never guess you could pickle. Here’s a partial list.

  • Radishes
  • tomatoes
  • okra
  • cabbage
  • carots,
  • beans’onions,
  • limes
  • mangoes
  • beets

International Pickle Day

Sunday, Oct. 17th

11 a.m. to 430 pm in the parking lot on Broomer Street and on Brome Street.

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Italian Deli: Top Italian Deli Purveyors from DiPalo’s and Coluccio & Sons Swap Stories

Toni Lydecker

Guest columnist, Toni Lydecker, author of Seafood alla Siciliana: Recipes and Stories from a Living Tradition, reported on a recent event in which two of New York’s famed Italian deli owners mused about their businesses, the younger generation coming up, and how to be a smart Italian deli shopper.

Italian deli is one of New York’s great food treasures.  And DiPalo’s Fine Foods at 200 Grand Street, perched on a corner of the still remaining sliver of Little Italy, sports old time marble countertops. Staff still tally the tab on a paper bag.  In fact, while some things haven’t changed since the Little Italy store was founded a century ago, there are new offerings afoot.

And in Coluccio & Sons’ aisles, in the heart of Bensonhurst at 1214 60th Street, you hear as much Italian as English. In some ways, these venerable family-owned specialty shops are never going to change—and thank God.

Lou diPalo and Louis Coluccio NY Italian deli owners. Photo: Toni Lydecker.

Lou diPalo and Louis Coluccio NY Italian deli owners. Photo: Toni Lydecker.

That didn’t stop moderator Michelle Scicolone (whose newest cookbook is The Italian Slow Cooker) from asking, “What’s new? “when Lou DiPalo and Louis Coluccio shared a stage at NYU’s Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò the other night.

One thing that’s new is that “ a new generation is coming into our businesses,” said DiPalo. His son Sam has been seeking out vintages from every Italian region for the family’s new wine shop.

And the vintage deli is going a bit 21st century.  At Di Palo’s, a new site, www.dipaloselects.com, reaches customers far beyond New York.

Coluccio, the young grandson of Coluccio & Sons’ founder, said the family is introducing a private-label artisanal pasta made in Gragnano. He’s working with Locanda Verde chef Andrew Carmellini and other chefs to educate consumers about authentic Italian products.

What do these deli chieftains like to eat when they’re not scooping freshly made ricotta for legions of faithful customers?

Lou: After closing up the store, we unwind with a great cheese (from a selection of more than 300; Testun from Piemonte is a current favorite), salumi, maybe some artichoke cream and olives, a good wine.

Louis: I take home pasta (he has a choice of 200 cuts) and San Marzano tomatoes and make a simple sauce.

Top tip for customers?

Louis: Don’t assume the costliest is the best. Sometimes the most expensive balsamic isn’t what you need.

Lou: Buy cheese cut to order if you can—the cut surfaces start to oxidize almost immediately, changing the flavor.  And always ask to taste it.

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Upper West Side: Taste of the Upper West Side Coming May 21-22

There are some who insist that there’s nothing much to taste when it comes to Upper West Side food. But others say there’s plenty to celebrate about the neighborhood’s robust dining scene. The New Taste of the Upper West Side is designed to let you sample a range of area restaurants’ offerings.

A panel on healthy eating, buying local and other foodie verities will kick off this year’s event, which takes place Mary 21 and 22. Then, once you’ve eaten your veggies so to speak, you can pig out on a lavish dessert spread. On May 22, there will be special cocktails and flavors from over 40 Upper West Side chefs.

Ticket prices range from $25 for the panel discussion to $85 for the dessert bash. It will set you back $200 for a VIP ticket to the May 22 food and drink event. If you want to know more, click here.

Taste of the Upper West Side 2010. Photo: www.newtasteuws.com.

Taste of the Upper West Side 2010. Photo: www.newtasteuws.com.

Participating restaurants and chefs:
Bar Boulud; Chef Damian Sansonetti
Blue Ribbon Sushi; Chefs Bruce & Eric Bromberg
Café Blossom; Chef Seamus Jones
Calle Ocho; Chef Luke Laru
Cesca; Chef Kevin Garcia
Compass; Chef Neil Annis
Dovetail; Chef John Fraser
Earthen Oven; Chef Durtha Prasad
Eighty One; Chef Ed Brown
Fatty Crab, Chef Zakary Pelaccio
Gabriel’s; Chef Matthew Hayden
Isabella’s; Chef John Lictro
Jacques Torres, Chocolatiers; Jacques Torres
Jean Georges; Chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten
Josie’s; Chef Louis Lanza
Kefi; Chef Michael Psilakis
Landmarc; Chef Marc Murphy
Madaleine Mae; Chef Jonathan Waxman
Magnolia Bakery
Nice Matin; Chef Andy D’Amico
Nonna; Chef Sam Demarco
Ocean Grill; Chef Juan Carlos Ortega
Rosa Mexicano; ChefJoe Quintana
Ruby Foos; Chef Shawn Edelman
Salumeria Rosi; Chef Caesare Casella
Shake Shack; Randy Garutti (Danny Meyer)
Telepan; Chef Bill Telepan

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